Saturday, January 29, 2011

How to Make Money with Goats



If you have a desire to have at least a few head of goats on your farm or large property, you may wish to know ways which you can make money by owning goats. You may even decide that getting a lot of goats may be a work from home answer if you are a dedicated animal lover.

Things You'll Need:
Goats
knowledge in goat care
Fenced property

Instructions
1. The most obvious way to make money with goats is to breed them and sell the offspring. But wait, it's not that easy. To get the most money for your goats, you should be looking to buy registered goats, particularly those of high quality from lines either proven in the conformation show ring (national shows, not 4-H) or those who are proven to be superior milkers.

Goat kids sold from proven show and top milkers command hundreds of dollars each. The mother of one of my doelings was purchased at a special sale for thousands.

2. Sell the milk. A good dairy goat will give you a gallon of milk a day or more. A gallon is approximately 8lbs. There are rules governing the sale of goat milk and this can be different in each area so contact your local FDA office or milk inspector. Easy to find a milk inspector by calling up a local cattle dairy owner. Normally, it is only legal to sell goat milk for non-human consumption but even then, the market is very good. Dog breeders adore it as do wildlife rehabilitators. You must learn how to safely milk your dairy goats and store your goat milk. Do your math carefully as to how many head of dairy goats you would need to start up a commercial dairy goat operation.

3. Sell the meat. Goat meat is quite expensive. There is quite a demand for it in ethnic markets. You will also find that there are two large meat kid pickups a year within the dairy goat world. These are held each Easter and Christmas season. Generally, these are people who drive state to state picking up dairy goat kids at predetermined locations. They pay a fairly hefty price for them. Boer goats are known for their meat quality and mix well with dairy goats. Other breeds that mix well for meat are Kikos and Tennessee Fainting Goats.

4. Rent them out. Goats are wonderful brush eaters. They are also small enough and agile enough to get into areas tractors and such either can't get into or would just rather not. The government itself rents time with large goat herds to clear out brushy areas prone to wildfires. California is a big state who makes use of these services regularly. A couple good dogs for herding and livestock protection and an easy-up easy-down electric fence system and your set to go. You should have a minimum of 50 head of goats for this. Any breed will do.



How to Make Goat Cheese

Goat cheese is a delicacy often used in many wonderful European dishes. This cheese can be pricey and somewhat enigmatic in quality. However if you learn how to make this fabulous cheese, then your search for the perfect goat cheese will end right in your own kitchen. Follow these key steps to make goat cheese and enjoy this tasty treat any time you want.

Things You'll Need:

Colander
Cheesecloth
Goat milk
Fresh lemon juice or vinegar
A large pot
Ladle
Salt and pepper to taste
Buttermilk (optional)
Additional seasonings (optional)

Instructions

1. Make a grocery list and obtain the basic materials needed to make the cheese. The list includes goat milk (about 2 Litres), lemons, kosher salt and cheese cloth. Also, you may also add buttermilk for an extra creamy flavor, if desired.

2. Heat the milk in a stainless steel/non-reactive pot to at least 185 degrees (or low heat). Allow to simmer, watching carefully to avoid boiling or burning.

3. Remove the milk from heat and allow to sit. Add lemon (or vinegar), stirring until the curds separate from the whey. The mixture should look like large clumps of cottage cheese when properly separated.

4. Line a colander with several layers of the cheesecloth. Ladle curds into a strainer, discarding the whey.

5. Allow curds to cool, squeezing as much moisture out of them as possible. Put curds in a bowl and season with sea salt. You can also add other seasonings of your choice, such as Herbs de Provence or whatever else you desire.

6. Press curds into the bowl to make a block, or wrap in cheesecloth. Place curds in the refrigerator for at least 1-2 days before removing and tasting.

Tips & Warnings

Be creative with the seasonings you add to the goat cheese. The French prefer salt and pepper. However Herbs de Provence, parsley and olive oil are sometimes used. You can also make this cheese without any seasonings.The whey can be used for protein shakes or other enriched meals if you don't want to discard it.Go to a farmers market for fresh goat milk. Supermarkets often do not carry goat milk or if they do it is of substandard freshness.Let the cheese warm to room temperature before serving to bring out the maximum flavor.Don't age the cheese too long if you plan to eat it fresh. The best goat cheese is not aged long at all (at most 2 days).

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